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Father, son arrested for triple murder near Forestville
Mar 1, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 1, 2013 ABC News

Two more men were arrested Tuesday in connection with a suspected drug-related triple homicide in the Forestville area last month, Sonoma County sheriff's officials said Friday morning.

Francis Dwyer, 65, was arrested at his residence in Truth or Consequences, N.M., and his son, 38-year-old Odin Leonard Dwyer, was arrested just outside Denver, Colo., according to the sheriff's office.

Mark William Cappello, 46, of Central City, Colo., was arrested Feb. 14 in Mobile, Ala. in connection with the fatal shootings. He is expected to be booked into Sonoma County Jail within the next several days, sheriff's officials said.

The Dwyers are expected to be extradited to Sonoma County in the near future, according to the sheriff's office.

The three men face charges for the Feb. 5 murders of Raleigh Butler, 26, a former Sonoma County resident who was living in Truckee, Richard Lewin, 46, of Huntington, N.Y., and Todd Klarkowski, 42, of Boulder, Colo.

Their bodies were found by Butler's brother and a woman in the bedroom of a cabin Butler's mother rented at 9707 Ross Station Road in the Forestville area.

Sheriff's Lt. Dennis O'Leary said the victims were waiting for someone who was going to sell them "a significant amount of marijuana." O'Leary said, "People associated with the victims said it was a pot deal that went bad."

'Barefoot Bandit' charged with crime he's serving time for
Feb 28, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 28, 2013 King 5 News

Just when you thought you’d seen the last of Colton Harris-Moore, he’s back, draped in drama once again.

Skagit County Prosecutor Rich Weyrich is pursuing a theft charge against Harris-Moore for stealing a plane from an Anacortes airport in 2010. However, he landed that plane in San Juan County.  Prosecutors there took jurisdiction, and went along with a massive plea deal that landed the Barefoot Bandit in prison for 6.5 years.

“Fifteen prosecutors from across the country, two U.S. attorneys and two judges agreed that the sentence for this matter was appropriate,” said Harris-Moore’s attorney John Henry Brown. “The only person who disagreed was Mr. Weyrich."

Weyrich says he wasn’t aware of the San Juan plea agreement and never agreed to one himself.  He wants the once notorious fugitive prosecuted locally for local crimes.

“Another county, without consulting us, took some of our charges and filed them as part of a plea bargain,” said Weyrich. “This surreptitious deal between the defense attorney and the San Juan County prosecutor turns the end of justice on its head.”

Prosecuting Colton Harris-Moore again could constitute double jeopardy. It’s quite possible the theft case will be thrown out by the judge. He could be convicted on a burglary charge connected to the airplane, but even that likely would not increase his sentence.

Seattle police turn to computer software to predict, fight crime
Feb 27, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 27, 2013 Seattle Times

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and Chief John Diaz announced today that police have begun using new “predictive policing” software in the city’s East and Southwest precincts in an effort to reduce crime through analysis of data on crime and location.

“This technology will allow us to be proactive rather than reactive in responding to crime,” said McGinn during a news conference. “This investment, along with our existing hot spot policing work, will help us to fulfill the commitments we made in the ’20/20′ plan to use data in deploying our officers to make our streets safer.”

According to a Los Angeles Times article on predictive policing employed by the LAPD, predictive policing is rooted in the notion that it is possible, through sophisticated computer analysis of information about previous crimes, to predict where and when crimes will occur. Based on models for predicting aftershocks from earthquakes, predictive policing forecasts the locations where crime is likely to occur.

It works by entering all crime and location data dating back to 2008 into a complex algorithm that generates a prediction about where crimes are likely to take place on a certain day and time. Officers are provided with these forecasts before beginning their shifts, and are assigned to use their “proactive time” between 911 calls to patrol those areas, according to Seattle police.

Grandmother Killed 2 Children, Herself: Cops
Feb 27, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 27, 2013 NBC Connecticut

A grandmother who was supposed to take her two grandsons from daycare to their birthday party at home instead killed the boys and herself, Connecticut state police said.

All three bodies were found in a car Tuesday evening, two hours after an Amber Alert went out for the 2-year-old and 6-month-old. Police have classified the case as a double murder-suicide and said all three had apparent gunshot wounds, according to state police.

The last time Alton, 2, and 6-month-old Ashton Perry had been seen alive was around 2:30 p.m. in North Stonington.

Their grandmother, Debra Denison, 47, left her Stonington home with a revolver and picked them up from daycare, according to state police.

The boys' mother, Brenda Perry, called state police around 4 p.m., when she could not find her sons and their grandmother, state police said.

She said she wanted the little boys to leave daycare early because it was Alton's birthday and they were supposed to open his presents. But the little boys and their grandmother never arrived for the party. 

"I wanted him to come home and play with his new toys and have a good day," Brenda Perry said.

An Amber Alert for  was issued around 7:30 p.m., according to state police, soon after a family member found a suicide note Denison had left behind.

Two officers, suspect shot and killed in Santa Cruz, California
Feb 26, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 26, 2013 Reuters

SANTA CRUZ, California  - Two police officers were shot dead in northern California in a mostly residential area of the city of Santa Cruz on Tuesday in a shootout with a gunman who was later killed by police, authorities said.

Police did not immediately release details on what led to the shooting involving the officers in the city 60 miles south of San Francisco, other than to say the officers were conducting an investigation before they came under fire.

"Two Santa Cruz police officers were shot and are deceased," Santa Cruz County Sheriff Phil Wowak told reporters. "One suspect was involved in the shooting. That suspect was shot and is deceased at this time."

Murdered journalist and rising crime unnerve Peru
Feb 25, 2013, - 0 Comments

* Police put more officers on the streets of Lima

* Rising crime rate a top concern among Peruvians

* U.S. couple missing, embassy helping in search

By Terry Wade and Mitra Taj

LIMA, Feb 25 (Reuters) - The brazen killing of a journalist in broad daylight and a deadly robbery in Peru's financial district prompted President Ollanta Humala to put 1,000 more police on the streets of the capital on Monday, to tackle a rising sense of public insecurity.

Interior Minister Wilfredo Pedraza rushed to reassign officers from desk jobs and put them in patrol cars as outraged citizens demanded swift action after Luis Choy, a prominent photojournalist for El Comercio, Peru's main newspaper, was gunned down in front of his house in a middle-class district of Lima on Saturday afternoon.

Investigators have said Choy, 34, was murdered by a hitman but have not yet identified a motive. Police officials did not say how many officers in total would now be on patrol.

Greece helicopter prison escape attempt foiled
Feb 25, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 24, 2013 Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — A helicopter swooped down on a prison courtyard Sunday as armed men on board fired on guards and lowered a rope to help a convicted killer make his fourth attempt to escape from a Greek prison.

But the plot was foiled after the prisoner was shot and the chopper forced to land in the prison's parking lot.

The dramatic escape attempt was one of a handful involving helicopters in Greece, and the first time such plans have failed.

Authorities said the chartered helicopter — carrying two armed passengers, a pilot and a technician — first tried to rip off the chicken-wire fence surrounding Trikala prison with a hook dangling from a rope. But that didn't work, so a rope was lowered down to whisk away Panagiotis Vlastos. Another prisoner, an unnamed Albanian national also in the courtyard at the time, may also have been part of the escape plan.

At the same time, the armed passengers used AK-47 assault rifles to fire on the prison guards. One guard, who was inside a post, was slightly injured by shards of flying glass. He and others returned fire, injuring Vlastos, who had managed to climb into the helicopter, as well as the helicopter's technician. Vlastos fell from a height of about 3 meters (10 feet) into the courtyard, and the helicopter was eventually grounded in the parking lot.

Vlastos, 43, is a convicted murderer and racketeer serving a life term who had tried and failed three times before to escape from prison.

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