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Organized crime gangs tried to fix hundreds of soccer matches, agency says
Feb 5, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 5, 2013 Associated Press

THE HAGUE, Netherlands • Organized crime gangs have fixed or tried to fix hundreds of soccer matches around the world in recent years, including World Cup and European Championship qualifiers and two Champions League games, Europol announced Monday.

The European Union’s police agency said an 18-month review found 380 suspicious matches in Europe and another 300 questionable games outside the continent, mainly in Africa, Asia and South and Central America. It also found evidence that a Singapore-based crime syndicate was involved in some of the match-fixing.

Europol refused to name any suspected matches, players, officials or match-fixers, saying that would compromise national investigations, so it remained unclear how much of the information divulged Monday was new or had already been revealed in trials across the continent.

Even so, the picture painted by Europol was the latest body blow for the credibility of sports in general, following cyclist Lance Armstrong’s admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs in all seven of his Tour de France wins.

“This is a sad day for European football (soccer),” Europol Director Rob Wainwright told reporters. He said criminals were cashing in on soccer corruption “on a scale and in a way that threatens the very fabric of the game.”

Europol said 425 match officials, club officials, players and criminals from at least 15 countries were involved in fixing European soccer games dating back to 2008.

Brandon Scott Knuckles being questioned after his mother, 78-year-old Marjorie Knuckles, found in a trash can
Feb 4, 2013, - 0 Comments

The last time anyone heard from Marjorie Knuckles, 78, was January 30, so a family friend decided to check on Marjorie and her 95-year-old mother on Sunday February 3.  During her visit, she did notice Marjorie was not home, but it appears Marjorie's mother was okay.

Alabama hostage standoff ends with child safe, gunman dead
Feb 4, 2013, - 0 Comments

Feb. 4, 2013 Reuters

A gunman holding a 5-year-old boy hostage in an underground bunker in rural Alabama was killed on Monday and the child was plucked to safety without injury, a local law enforcement official said.

"It's all over," said the official, who asked not to be identified by name because he had not been authorized to discuss the operation that led to the successful rescue of the child.

"The boy is OK," he said.

The rescue of boy came on the seventh day of a standoff in a rural corner of southeast Alabama involving a suspect identified as 65-year-old Jimmy Lee Dykes, a retired trucker and Vietnam veteran.

Dykes seized the boy last Tuesday after boarding a school bus near his home and killing its driver with four shots from a 9 mm handgun, local sheriff's department officials said.

The law enforcement source said a stun or flash grenade was detonated as part of the operation to free the boy, but further details were not immediately available.

Australian heiress Janie Shepherd is abducted - 1977
Feb 4, 2013, - 0 Comments

Shepherd

Janie Shepherd newspaper clipping

by Michael Thomas Barry

Australian heiress Janie Shepherd, the stepdaughter of the former chairman of BP Australia, John Darling was abducted and murdered by David Lashley on the night of February 4, 1977 in West London.  Lashley, a 50-year-old West Indian with a psychopathic hatred of white women, worked as a driver, had an obsession with blondes and raped or indecently assaulted six others between 1969 and 1977.

Mass Murder in Rural Connecticut - 1780
Feb 3, 2013, - 0 Comments

davenport

Portrait of Barnett Davenport

by Michael Thomas Barry

On February 3, 1780, Barnett Davenport murders Caleb Mallory, his wife, daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren in rural Connecticut. Davenport was born in 1760; he enlisted in the American army as a teenager and had served at Valley Forge and Fort Ticonderoga. In the waning days of the Revolutionary War he took a job with Caleb Mallory, a farmer who operated a grist mill in Washington. Mallory and his wife Jane had two daughters who lived in the area.

Texas man arraigned on murder charges in shooting of "American Sniper"
Feb 3, 2013, - 0 Comments

 

Feb. 3, 2013 Reuters

The man accused of gunning down former U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, a prominent military sniper, and a second man at a Texas shooting range has been arraigned on two counts of capital murder, the Texas Department of Public Safety said on Sunday.

Eddie Ray Routh, 25, was accused of killing Kyle, 38, and Chad Littlefield, 35, a neighbor of Kyle, on Saturday afternoon at the Rough Creek Lodge, about 50 miles southwest of Fort Worth, the department said.

"They were shot at close range," said department spokesman Sergeant Lonny Haschel said.

Kyle, considered one of America's deadliest snipers after killing 160 people during his career as U.S. Navy SEAL sniper, wrote the book "American Sniper" about his military service from 1999 to 2009.

Routh, described in local media reports as a former Marine who suffered from post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD), was arrested at his Lancaster, Texas home several hours after the shooting, having led police on a chase in his pickup truck.

"He was taken into custody after a brief pursuit," Haschel said.

According to a posting on a website run by members of the Special Operations Forces community, Kyle had been volunteering his time to help Marine Corps veterans suffering from PTSD and mentoring them.

British Serial Killer "Jack the Stripper" claims first known victim - 1964
Feb 2, 2013, - 0 Comments

jack the stripper

Hannah Tailford is the first known victim of Jack the Stripper

by Michael Thomas Barry

Jack the stripper was the nickname given to an unknown British serial killer responsible for what came to be known as the London "nude murders" between 1964 and 1965 (also known as the "Hammersmith murders" or "Hammersmith nudes" case). He murdered six — possibly eight —prostitutes, whose nude bodies were discovered around London or dumped in the River Thames.

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