Blogs

Ohio teen makes obscene gesture, gets life for shooting rampage
Mar 19, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 19, 2013 Reuters

CHARDON, Ohio - An Ohio teenager wearing a T-shirt with "killer" scrawled on it gave a profane statement and made an obscene gesture in court as he was sentenced to life in prison without parole on Tuesday for killing three students in a school shooting rampage last year.

T.J. Lane, 18, also wounded three students in the attack in a high school cafeteria in Chardon, a small town east of Cleveland, leaving one paralyzed from the waist down.

Lane's attack in February 2012 was one of several mass shootings in the United States last year, including a massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut December.

Lane sat facing the families of the children he shot and gave a brief profane statement. He then made an obscene gesture directed at the families before Geauga County Judge David Fuhry imposed the sentence.

Lane had pleaded guilty to all of the charges against him on February 26, a day before the one-year anniversary of his attack. He was charged as an adult, but because he was 17 at the time of the rampage he was ineligible for the death penalty.

Fuhry said Lane lacked remorse and examinations showed he had feigned mental illness. A bright student set to graduate from high school early, Lane instead long planned, prepared for, and then executed the attack, he said.

The Hill-Robinson Murders - 1969
Mar 19, 2013, - 0 Comments

Hill and robinson

John Robert Hill and Joan Robinson-Hill

by Michael Thomas Barry

On March 19, 1969, Joan Robinson-Hill the daughter of wealthy Texas oilman Ash Robinson dies of an apparent heart attack in Houston, Texas. She and her plastic surgeon husband John Robert Hill had married in 1957. They led separate lives – he was busy with his practice and she was a keen equestrian. However, leading separate lives did not mean that Mrs. Hill wanted her husband to share the beds of other ladies. On December 3, 1968 Dr. Hill filed for divorce but back down when his wife contested the petition. In March 15, 1969 he again instigated divorce proceedings.

NY stop and frisk challenge in federal court
Mar 18, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 18, 2013 Associated Press

NEW YORK  — A class-action suit challenging the New York Police Department's stop and frisk policy got under way Monday with a lawyer saying that officers have been wrongly stopping tens of thousands of young men based solely on their race.

Darius Charney of the Center for Constitutional Rights said the policy is legal, but the department is doing stops illegally. Changes must be ordered by a federal judge to ensure the department stops wrongly targeting black and Hispanic men, he said.

He called many of the half million annual stops a "frightening and degrading experience" for "thousands if not millions" of New Yorkers over the last decade. He called them "arbitrary, unnecessary and unconstitutional."

He promised plaintiffs will show the judge "powerful testimonial and statistical evidence" that New Yorkers are routinely stopped without suspicion.

The Yosemite Murders - 1999
Mar 18, 2013, - 0 Comments

Stayner

Cary Stayner

by Michael Thomas Barry

On March 18, 1999, the bodies of Carole Sund and Silvina Pelosso are found in a charred rental car in a remote wooded area of Long Barn, California. The women, along with Sund's daughter Juli, had been missing since February when they were last seen alive at the Cedar Lodge near Yosemite National Park.

Raymond Clark III pleads guilty to murdering Annie Le - 2011
Mar 17, 2013, - 0 Comments

clark and Le

Raymond Clark III and Annie Le

by Michael Thomas Barry

On March 17, 2011, Raymond Clark III, a former animal research assistant at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, pleads guilty to the murder and attempted sexual assault of 24-year-old Yale graduate student Annie Le. On September 13, 2009, Le’s partially decomposed body was found stuffed behind a wall in the university research building where she was last seen five days earlier.

Copper theft technology used to thwart crime bonanza
Mar 17, 2013, - 0 Comments

March 17, 2013 Contra Costa Times

CONCORD -- Some Bay Area cities would like Daniel Meyers to be the new poster boy for copper thievery. In an era when copper thefts are soaring and thieves loot with near impunity, Meyers' arrest was surprisingly routine.

Police say that on May 21, Meyers cut and took $1,050 worth of copper wire from a rural area near Columbus Parkway in Vallejo, put the stolen goods in a Cadillac Escalade and drove to an apartment.

Thanks to tracking technology, police followed his every move. The 32-year-old was arrested a short time later. He has since pleaded not guilty and is awaiting trial in April on charges of grand theft and receiving stolen property.

This electronic tracking technology is what Vallejo officials hope will put an end to the copper theft bonanza. Other cities also are eyeing the prospective solution to what has, in recent years, become a scourge that affects traffic lights, park lighting, building wiring and other public and private facilities that run on electricity.

Once a major component in making 1-cent coins, copper now is costing cities a pretty penny to replace. Thefts have soared along with the price of copper: The metal now goes for $4 a pound at salvage yards, nearly three times the price four years ago. But it's costing cities much more to replace.

Jilted Lover Murder - 1881
Mar 16, 2013, - 0 Comments

Forster

Francisco "Chico" Forster

by Michael Thomas Barry

On March 16, 1881, Francisco "Chico" Forster is shot to death on a downtown Los Angeles street by his jilted lover, eighteen-year old Lastania Abarta. The forty-year old Forster was the son of a wealthy Los Angeles land developer and considered one of the city's most eligible bachelors despite his reputation for womanizing and poorly treating women. Abarta worked in her parent's pool hall, where she sang, played the guitar, and met frequent customer Forster.

Pages