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Prosecution, defense rest in D.C. cop’s murder trial
Jan 17, 2013, - 0 Comments

Jan. 17, 2013 Washington Post

The fate of a married D.C. police officer charged with killing his mistress and their 11-month-old daughter will soon be in the hands of twelve Prince George’s County residents.

Attorneys rested their cases in the trial of Richmond Phillips, who is facing two first-degree murder charges and other related counts, on Thursday morning. Defense attorneys called no witnesses, and Phillips did not testify.

After both sides deliver closing arguments, scheduled to begin at 1 p.m., the case will head to the jury.

Prosecutors have said Phillips, 40, shot and killed 20-year-old Wynetta Wright outside a Hillcrest Heights comunity center in May 2011 because he did not want to pay her child support.

The slaying occurred hours before Phillips was to submit a DNA sample that would ultimately prove he was the father of Wright’s daughter, Jaylin Wright.

After killing Wynetta Wright, prosecutors have said, Phillips drove Jaylin in Wynetta Wright’s SUV to a nearby apartment complex and left her in the hot vehicle to die. He then lied to investigators probing her disappearance and death, prosecutors said.

Defense attorneys have acknowledged Phillips lied several times to investigators but said he did so to cover up an affair, not a murder. They have said Phillips met with Wynetta Wright in the hours before she was killed but left her alone in a dangerous area to take another daughter to school.

FBI: Dozens arrested in US trash-hauling case
Jan 17, 2013, - 0 Comments

Jan. 16, 2013 Associated Pess

NEW YORK -- Federal authorities have charged 32 people, including a dozen alleged mobsters and associates, with using threats of violence and shakedowns to control garbage pickup routes in New York City's suburbs.

FBI agents arrested 30 of the defendants on Wednesday on racketeering conspiracy, extortion and other counts during morning raids around the city and its northern suburbs, as well as in New Jersey. Two more were expected to surrender later in the day.

An indictment identifies 12 of the defendants as either official members or associates of the Genovese, Gambino and Luchese organized crime families. The crime families have a long tradition of infiltrating and extorting trash collection companies at a cost partly borne by paying customers.

"In addition to the violence that often accompanies their schemes, the economic impact amounts to a mob tax on goods and services," George C. Venizelos, head of New York's FBI office, said in a statement.

Court papers allege the extortion ring controlled several trash hauling companies in Westchester, Rockland and Nassau counties in New York, and in Bergen and Passaic counties in New Jersey. The men extorted protection money from the companies and told them which routes they could use, the papers say.

The Great Brinks Robbery - 1950
Jan 17, 2013, - 0 Comments

Brinks

Newspaper account of the heist

by Michael Thomas Barry

On January 17, 1950, a team of eleven thieves, in a precisely timed and choreographed strike, steals more than $2 million from the Brinks Armored Car depot in Boston, Massachusetts. The Great Brinks Robbery, as it quickly became known, was the almost perfect crime. Ironically, only days before the statute of limitations were set to expire on the crime, the culprits were finally caught.

Obama unveils sweeping plan to battle gun violence
Jan 16, 2013, - 0 Comments

Jan. 16, 2013 Yahoo

"I will put everything I’ve got into this,” Obama, standing alongside Vice President Joe Biden, promised an audience that included relatives of the first-graders slaughtered at Sandy Hook Elementary School, survivors of other mass shootings and elected officials.

"While there is no law, or set of laws, that can prevent every senseless act of violence completely, no piece of legislation that will prevent every tragedy, every act of evil, if there’s even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there’s even one life that can be saved, then we’ve got an obligation to try," Obama said in his speech. "And I’m going to do my part."

The president declared himself a firm believer in the Second Amendment and denounced those who will cast his "common-sense" approach as "a tyrannical, all-out assault on liberty." He also warned those inclined to support his strategy that passage "will be difficult."

“This will not happen unless the American people demand it. If parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, if hunters and sportsmen, if responsible gun owners, if Americans of every background stand up and say, ‘Enough, we’ve suffered too much pain and care too much about our children to allow this to continue,' then change will come," he said. "That’s what it’s going to take."

Bowing to political reality, Obama’s proposals included a wave of 23 executive actions that circumvent Congress, where most Republicans and a few Democrats have balked at sweeping new restrictions they say could trample constitutional gun rights. The potent National Rifle Association lobby has also pledged to defeat new gun control measures.

The Moon Maniac is executed - 1936
Jan 16, 2013, - 0 Comments

Fish

Albert Fish aka the Moon Maniac

by Michael Thomas Barry

On January 16, 1936, Albert Fish the infamous “Moon Maniac” is executed at Sing Sing prison in New York. Fish was one of America's most notorious and disturbed killers. Authorities believe that Fish killed as many as 10 children and then ate their remains. Fish went to the electric chair with great anticipation, telling guards, "It will be the supreme thrill, the only one I haven't tried."

2 killed, 1 wounded in shooting at Ky. college
Jan 16, 2013, - 0 Comments

Jan. 16, 2013, Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A gunman firing into a vehicle killed two people and wounded a juvenile Tuesday as they sat in the parking lot of an eastern Kentucky community college.

The campus was locked down for more than an hour while police searched the two buildings of Hazard Community and Technical College in Hazard, Ky., to ensure there was no further danger before allowing students to leave, police told a news conference broadcast live on WYMT-TV's website.

College President Stephen Greiner said that at the time of the shooting, there were probably about 30 students on campus, which is based 90 miles southeast of Lexington, Ky.

Police recovered the weapon, a semiautomatic pistol, at the scene, Hazard Police Chief Minor Allen said. He said a man who walked into an office of the Kentucky State Police in Hazard and said he knew something about the shooting was being questioned as a suspect. The man had not been charged with a crime and no other suspects had been identified at the time of the news conference, which was held about three hours after the shooting.

A male and female were already dead when police arrived about 6 p.m., Allen said. The wounded juvenile, a female, was taken to University of Kentucky Hospital, he said.

Gunman wounds man, himself at St. Louis school
Jan 15, 2013, - 0 Comments

Jan. 15, 2013 Associated Press

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A part-time student strode into the office of a longtime administrator at a downtown St. Louis business school Tuesday and shot the man in the chest, creating panic in the school before turning the gun on himself, police said.

Both men were in surgery Tuesday afternoon at Saint Louis University Hospital. Police Chief Sam Dotson said he was optimistic both would survive, but a hospital spokesman declined to discuss their conditions.

Police did not identify either man, but Dotson said the administrator was a longtime employee in his late 40s. He said the suspect had been attending Stevens Institute of Business & Arts off and on for four years and had no history of threats or violence.

Dotson said police arrived to find a "chaotic" scene with many students running out of the five-story historic building in the downtown loft district of St. Louis. About 40 to 50 people were in the building when gunfire broke out, and police evacuated them before starting a floor-by-floor search with tactical teams and dogs.

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